Acorns, the Super Food

So, cooking food does not increase its caloric value beyond that of the combined ingredients.

If you throw a bunch of asparagus and a blob of lard in a skillet, you end up with much higher calorie asparagus - but no more than actually went in the skillet to start with, it just took up a lot of the lard calories.

Cooking can reduce the number of calories in a food (esp if you burn it) - but it can also reduce the number of calories required to digest the food by breaking up some of the tougher chemical bonds ahead of time. This can result in a net caloric gain for the person eating it, even though the foodstuff itself hasn’t gained calories. I don’t think this would ever be more than a modest % gain however, unless the stuff you started with was virtually inedible.

So sure, cooking a hard to digest meal like acorns or highly fibrous wild vegetables might improve the net caloric value for eating them, but not all that much. For the most part, what you get out == what you put in, 'cause thermodynamics applies to chemistry and biology just as much as it does to physics.

Taste and general palatability, of course, are a whole different ball game. Cooking can improve those as much as one cares to imagine — though of course flavor is in the taste buds of the beholder.

Well, there is a very smart work around for this if you play without simplified nutrition (I think it was removed for O.D.) is that acorns don’t provide you with enough support in the vitamin department to be sustanible, you would have to supplement it with cooked vegetables, wild herbs, or maybe just some good ol’ fashion seeds. Anyways it would be a lot smarter to use acorns for flour, to make meat pie or pelmini for a better use…

It’s done : #29050
Cooked Acorns has 114 ca and 1 charge instead 456 ca and 2 charges.

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Now only its mass conservation during crafting is broken 30g of acorns turn into 100g of acorn meal and its energy density which should be around 500 kcal per 100g is broken. Both could be fixed by reducing the weight to around 20g of the crafted acorn meal.

So Wikipedia says 3,87Kcal/g for acorns
google (not sure if linking a google search will work) says 5ca/g for acorn flour.
This and this say 0.56ca/g for cooked acorn
And That one says 0.4ca/g for cooked acorn
Finally wikipedia says 27.9% water for acorn and this says 82.9% water for cooked acorn which would explain the very low calorie count.

The description of cooked acorn meal in the game specifies that it is dried, so water content should be very low logically.

So turn down the mass to 30g- 30g*28% = 21.6g and put the calorie to 21.6g *5ca/g = 108ca ?

That sounds about right, good job.

Those numbers look about right to me.

All you guys are talking about how OP acorns are, but you havnen’t talked about pine nuts yet, availible year round with 202 calories if cooked…

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pine trees however die when harvested, means you’ll need to find new forrests to keep a steady supply, also in less quantity than acorns

Yeah, that’s the ridiculous part, wonder why you can’t just take the cones off instead, because boughs are only good for superglue and makeshift shelters tbh, plus they’re like 1 L of volume which makes boughs even more annoying, especially since the harvesting prioritizes the boughs instead of nuts…

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pine needle tea is pretty good and boughs are required for some faction camp upgrades.\

however i don’t understand why pine trees die when harvested. i mean you only take off a few boughs and the tree must be pretty tall and dense. perhaps just break a few branches not actually tear down the whole tree

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Yeah, I didn’t think about the tea, but still you can just harvest some herbs or be balm for that, plus super glue is used alot for mechanics and fabrication, so just got a little pretentious about usefullness…

(JFC just had a heartattack because I thought I forgot that I worked today… Good thing I don’t, lol.)

Maybe I shouldn’t have said anything…

pine boughs are way easier to get than herbs as they spawn randomly through forage. i think you only need some survival skill book and some survival to make it and it has healthy food flag i think plus provides plenty of quench and morale

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I think it’s just a placeholder mechanic so you can’t keep harvesting the same tree over and over. It needs an intermediary “harvested pine tree” step, one which will grow back in a season. Or you could harvest it again and then it would be a “dead pine tree.”

Makes no sense. The amount of cones or apples on a tree does not affect the tree’s survival. The second phase would better be called ‘strip the poor tree of its bark and branches and leave it to die in the woods’. THEN it would really be dead.

(i mean that peeling bark off the tree is not really harvesting, is it? harvesting is more like picking plums or whatever this tree grows as fruit, imho)

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yes it might be a balance issues but i do think it needs rework. make it work once a season, or year. and make low yields since you cant really reach the top of the tree without some ladder. an option for having more boughs should be chopping down the tree, not sure if in present chopping pine trees yields pine boughs

Other trees don’t die when u harvest them.
So it’s probably a leftover from when foraging was less devlopped. It could be changed to not die .

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Soooo…this and the latter?

I know. Shameless. But I did make these for the purpose of consolidation =D
Which reminds me. In the back of that book I have been meaning to post a few pages of. They have fairly detailed charts of nutritional value of much of what is commonly foraged. I keep forgetting about that. I’ll do it after I finish my pizza :wink: